Job Seeker Blog

Americans with disabilities still can’t land jobs

Before the Americans with Disabilities Act, the country was a very different place for people with disabilities, who had to navigate hurdles such as inaccessible public buildings. Yet when it comes to the workforce, the hurdles may not look much different than they did 27 years ago.

The share of adults with disabilities who are working by some measures hasn’t improved since the ADA was passed in July 1990. When the law was signed, about half of disabled Americans were employed, a share that declined to 41 percent by 2010, according to Census data.

Before the Americans with Disabilities Act, the country was a very different place for people with disabilities, who had to navigate hurdles such as inaccessible public buildings. Yet when it comes to the workforce, the hurdles may not look much different than they did 27 years ago.

The share of adults with disabilities who are working by some measures hasn’t improved since the ADA was passed in July 1990. When the law was signed, about half of disabled Americans were employed, a share that declined to 41 percent by 2010, according to Census data.

Ironically, some economists suggest the ADA may have made it less likely for employers to hire people with disabilities because of the costs they might incur for providing accommodations. Yet disability advocates point out that Americans with disabilities face a host of complex issues such as stigmas, typically lower education rates and higher rates of poverty, which add to the difficulties of finding a job while disabled.

Full article here.

posted in: Blogging, California, Diversity, EmployerNews, Florida, Georgia, Graduation, Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, New York, News, North Carolina, Personal, Wisconsin

Want a job when you graduate? Major in these areas

Until college graduation, students spend their whole lives preparing for one thing: a job.

Fortunately, unemployment among college graduates has been on the decline in the last decade, but many graduates still struggle to find well-paying jobs to start their new lives in the workforce.

College graduates with a bachelor’s degree or higher are currently facing an unemployment rate of only 2.4 percent, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Compare that to the average unemployment rate of the working population of the U.S., which is almost twice that, at 4.4 percent — clearly, getting a degree makes you more marketable.

Until college graduation, students spend their whole lives preparing for one thing: a job.

Fortunately, unemployment among college graduates has been on the decline in the last decade, but many graduates still struggle to find well-paying jobs to start their new lives in the workforce.

College graduates with a bachelor’s degree or higher are currently facing an unemployment rate of only 2.4 percent, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Compare that to the average unemployment rate of the working population of the U.S., which is almost twice that, at 4.4 percent — clearly, getting a degree makes you more marketable.

Full article here.

posted in: Blogging, California, Diversity, EmployerNews, Florida, Georgia, Graduation, Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, New York, News, North Carolina, Personal, Wisconsin

The 9 most in-demand jobs that pay more than $100,000

A six-figure job is often seen as the hallmark of success, but how difficult is it to find one?

Workers in certain high-paying professions are likely to face a tougher time securing a job, based on a combination of demand, skills and industry trends. Many of the six-figure jobs that are in most demand don’t require advanced degrees, which may also explain their appeal to job-seekers, according to a new survey from Glassdoor.

A six-figure job is often seen as the hallmark of success, but how difficult is it to find one?

Workers in certain high-paying professions are likely to face a tougher time securing a job, based on a combination of demand, skills and industry trends. Many of the six-figure jobs that are in most demand don’t require advanced degrees, which may also explain their appeal to job-seekers, according to a new survey from Glassdoor.

Prospective employees in these professions should put extra time into their job search, resumes and interview prep to make sure they stand out, the employment site said. Given that median income for U.S. households stands at slightly more than $56,000, scoring a job that pays almost twice that level can be provide a significant income bump. While they may not require graduate degrees, these occupations generally require training and special skills.

The most in-demand, high-paying jobs “can attract people with an undergraduate degree and relevant work experience, which is a much bigger pool of people, in most cases, than those holding a specific advanced degree,” said Scott Dobroski, community expert at Glassdoor.

He added, “In other words, if there is high competition for an open role, this translates into more people hitting that apply button online, which means it will be harder for job-seekers to get the attention of a hiring manager and potentially score an interview.”Full article here.

posted in: Blogging, California, Diversity, EmployerNews, Florida, Georgia, Graduation, Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, New York, News, North Carolina, Personal, Wisconsin

Compare Nonprofit, For-Profit Online Degree Programs

While there’s still a stigma against for-profits, the quality of education varies widely within the sector, experts say.

To some students, a for-profit online degree program seems like a risky option.

“I’ve seen a lot of reports for a lot of years about how for-profit schools have pretty much based their incomes on the ability for students to get federal financial aid,” says 30-year-old Matt Warner, a cybersecurity and information assurance master’s student at the nonprofit, online Western Governors University.

Though he’s personally hesitant about for-profits, he suggests prospective students focus more on factors such as cost and the degrees offered.

For California resident Carlos Ramirez, enrolling in an online doctoral program in health administration at the for-profit University of Phoenix was a no-brainer. Ramirez previously earned his bachelor’s and master’s at the school and was satisfied with its flexibility and student support.

Experts say in online education, a school’s classification as a for-profit versus nonprofit tells prospective online students little about overall quality.

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“I think it’s less about the sector and more on how attentive the institution is to meeting the needs of students, to understanding best practices, to preparing their faculty for this robust learning experience,” says Karen Pedersen, chief knowledge officer for the Online Learning Consortium, an organization aiming to improve online higher education.

For-profit institutions have faced criticism in recent years for questionable recruitment practices, low graduation rates and high student debt. Though employers today are becoming more receptive to accepting candidates with for-profit, online degrees, there’s still a stigma around them, experts say.

[Discover how employers view for-profit online bachelor’s degrees.]

“It’s a distinction that has gotten a lot of press over the last many years, and I’m not sure that it’s warranted,” says Betty Vandenbosch, president of the for-profit Kaplan University, which delivers many degrees online.

When for-profit online degree programs started becoming more prevalent around 1999, they accepted almost anybody who applied, including those who weren’t sufficiently prepared for college, says Kathleen Ives, OLC’s CEO and executive director, who has served as faculty for both for-profits and nonprofits. That, she says, contributed to low graduation rates and high debt for those who dropped out.

That initial focus primarily on corporate profits “has tainted much of the for-profit sector. And not fairly, because the for-profit institutions are just as diverse as the nonprofit institutions,” says David Schejbal, dean of continuing education, outreach and e-learning at the University of Wisconsin—Extension, which coordinates continuing education and online programs across 26 statewide campuses.

Read full article here.

posted in: Blogging, California, Diversity, EmployerNews, Florida, Georgia, Graduation, Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, New York, News, North Carolina, Personal, Wisconsin

Gender diversity at work: using education to tackle the backlash

Conversations about the advancement of women at work are now so commonplace that it can seem like a foregone conclusion that, someday soon, women will have equal opportunities and pay.

But then you start wading through the comments under news articles on gender diversity and you realise there is a very angry, resentful undertow from some (mostly men) who demonstrate a fear that when women win, men and families will lose.

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posted in: Blogging, Diversity, EmployerNews, News

POLL: Women more concerned about gender diversity in the workplace

Women business leaders are about twice as likely as their male counterparts to say their company should put more effort into increasing gender diversity, a new poll said.

One-quarter of the women polled said their employer should be doing more to advance female employees compared to about 12 percent of the men, according to the latest CohnReznick-New Jersey Chamber of Commerce Business Climate Survey, released Wednesday.

The survey, which focused on women in the workplace, revealed “a disconnect” in men’s and women’s perceptions of gender diversity, said Philip Mandel, regional managing partner at CohnReznick, a New York City-based accounting firm.

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posted in: Diversity, EmployerNews, News

Finding common ground in workplace diversity

The recent shootings of Black men throughout our country and police officers in Dallas and Baton Rouge have ignited discussions about diversity in the community as well as the workforce.
What is the meaning of diversity? Most Americans would say diversity incorporates race, gender and ethnicity and stops there. But I believe diversity involves much more than that.
Though I agree the above three components represent some of the primary dimensions of diversity, we must also include age, sexual orientation and physical and mental ability. And there are secondary dimensions: religion, lifestyle, style of dress, language, communication style, personality style, geographic location, learning style and even military service. All of these components of diversity are part of today’s workplace.

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posted in: Diversity, EmployerNews, News

3 Ways We Can Increase Diversity In Corporate America

Diversity in corporate leadership, especially among fast-growth companies, is no longer a nice-to-have, a buzz-word, or a marketing ploy. It’s an economic necessity.

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posted in: Diversity, News

Davos 2016: it’s time to talk about gender inequality

The Girls’ Lounge at the World Economic Forum is spearheading an important debate about the lack of women at the heart of the business world

“I think every woman in this room has the same question. What’s the hold-up?” asks Bloomberg Television anchor Stephanie Ruhle, as she looks at two male C-level executives on either side of her.

The hold-up she’s referring to is the glacial speed of improvement in gender equality in the workplace. It’s the penultimate day of the World Economic Forum’s (WEF) annual meeting in Davos, where men outnumber women five to one. Ruhle is moderating an intimate session at The Girls’ Lounge, an informal space set up as a destination for women attendees, otherwise known as “the 18%”.

Since day one of the conference, which brought in 2,500 elite leaders in business, media and government, The Girls’ Lounge has held continuous discussions featuring powerhouse influencers, including Arianna Huffington, Twitter chief operating officer Adam Bain and Facebook vice-president of global marketing solutions Carolyn Everson.

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posted in: Diversity

How CIOs can help promote gender diversity in the workplace

There has been a lot of discussion about diversity in IT over the last couple of years. After releasing statistics showing a general lack of diversity among their workers, several tech companies, including Microsoft, Intel and HP, vowed to double their efforts to promote more diverse workplaces.

There has been a lot of discussion about diversity in IT over the last couple of years. After releasing statistics showing a general lack of diversity among their workers, several tech companies, including Microsoft, Intel and HP, vowed to double their efforts to promote more diverse workplaces.

Some of those efforts have slightly improved racial diversity. Gender diversity, however, has remained a challenge.

On average, women comprise about one-third of the workforce, according to a recent analysis of nine major tech companies by Fortune. And the higher up you go, the worse it gets.

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posted in: Diversity

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